Dictionary of Human Evolution and Biology

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Adaptive Landscape

Sinuous topographical graph of the average fitnesses of small, subdivided, and isolated populations in relation to the frequencies of the genotypes residing in it. Peaks in such a landscape (multiple-peaked fitness surfaces) correspond to genotypic frequencies at which the average fitness is high; valleys to genotypic frequencies at which the average fitness is low. Proposed by Sewall Wright. Aka adaptive topography, fitness surface, surface of selective value.

See shifting balance theory.

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